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with a one-two punch of ice and extremely bitter cold. this is the twin cities, minneapolis, st. paul where normally they eat winter storms for breakfast. 12 degrees right you in in minneapolis and with the windchill, zero degrees fahrenheit. forecasters there say this might be the coldest cold snap in ten years. >>> question, are you a casual football fan or are you a die hard football maniac? an impressive of blanket of snow didn't keep fans out of the stands or the players off the field in philadelphia. look at that. the philadelphia eagles won, by the way, 34-20 over detroit. both teams are winners when you think about what they played in. the highway patrol says eyes and bad visibility to blame in this pile-up in milwaukee countiy, wisconsin. 18 wheelers jack knifed and cars smashed into them. more than 40 vehicles wreck individual. police up and down the shore of lick michigan are advising people, guess what? stay home. >>> headed toward the east coast now, it is not wisconsin cold, but it is certainly nasty. 31 degrees and freezing. it is making for an interesting day at reagan natio
-republican kentucky senator rand paul. >> i do support unemployment benefits for the 26 weeks they are paid for. if you extend it beyond that, you do a disservice to these workers. when you allow people to be on unemployment insurance for 99 weeks, you're causing them to become part of this perpetual unemployed group in our economy. >> joining me today, "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, former white house press secretary and founding partner off-almost said founding father -- founding father and partner of inside agency robert gibbs, congressional reporter for buzz feed and political reporter and white house correspondent at the "huffington post" sam stein. we talked a lot about the pizza versus the pizza box. after the gop autopsy, the republican conviction they didn't actually need to change the product they were selling, they just needed to change the marketing. it's unbelievable me, the whole 47% thing clearly has not made a dent. nowhere do you see that in a more pronounced fashion than republican talking points on unemployment. >> largely, if you ask most members of the gop,
of that happening are -- >> i don't know. we're going to have more fun. the next topic, rand paul thinks he can save the bankruptcy city of detroit with conservative economics. we'll hear part of the interview next and this song came to me in a dream this morning. i haven't been able to get it out of my head all day. so now, from my head to yours. morning and i haven't been able to get it out of my head. now from my head to yours. ♪ if you ♪ . >>> welcome back everybody. senator rand paul brought his conservative message of economic opportunity to the largest city in american history to declare bankruptcy, detroit. the senator unveiled his plan declaring detriot the economic freedom zone which includes a flat and low tax, a scaled back epa and outreach to the community. i sat down with senator paul and asked him if politicians on both sides of the aisle were doing enough. >> five years of obama economic policies lead to very high elevated unemployment in the black community. and, frankly, the republicans are perceived as not caring about minorities. what's your plan? >> we're going to compete, t
away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. >> woodruff: back in the u.s., paul solman digs into today's jobs report, which points to strong gains in hiring and a five-year low in the unemployment rate. and mark shields and david brooks are here. they reflect on mandela's life and the rest of the week's news. those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the death of nelson mandela resonated across south africa and around the world today. millions mourned the former president and symbol of racial reconciliation and official
news producer paul tell usually joins us from outside nelson mandela's home. good evening, sir. tell me what's going on outside there now. >> good evening, greta. south africa is not sleeping tonight. especially in the places nelson mandela touched. people are out in the streets. outside mr. mandela's formal house 20 miles from here. and outside his current home here in north johannesburg where he passed away. it may well be after midnight here but the crowds are still growing. there are hundreds here. the mood has changed quite rapidly to one of quiet shock to frankly boisterous celebration of his life. this is a typical almost uniquely south african reaction, greta. people of all colors, many who have wrapped themselves in the south african flag, some holding candles are toy toying, a revolutionary dance. they are singing his name. one young woman outside his home here is holding up a sign saying it's in our hands now. inside the house a large richly furnished home i have been lucky enough to enter many times to film mr. mandela, the former president was surrounded by family members a
the world in the next couple of days bret. >> live in london, greg, thank you. >>> fox news producer paul tilsley is in jo happehannesbuj. >> crowds started to gather long before his announcement that he had passed on. one man came along to play flowers outside the house. he told me had been phoned by a family member that worked sign side the house to say he had died. there was a deep quiet as other journalists started to arrive and set up equipment. now here bret, it's in the middle of the night. it's after midnight. i have managed to speak to a few people around mandela's house to ask them about their feelings. they're all without exception in deep shock. some are in tears. every one expected this. he's been ill a very long time. no one here wanted it to happen, bret. >> you know, eight years ago, paul, i've been told you were asked to be his personal videographer. >> that's correct. >> you have some antidotes. >> even in the beginning of the relationship it was quite amusi amusing. i interviewed him a few times. i was working for another client and had just come out of the coal mine. i
and he came over and whispered, lucky you. he turned to me and says, paul, is this the car i came in? well he's going on a journey now. and after up to two weeks of ceremonies it will end up with him being laid to rest, greta. >> you know, we hear about him being humble. none of us knew him personally. we look at the things he has done this his life. but he tonight, would he be surprised that the whole world is looking at this, all eyes on south africa in a wave of sadness going across the world? >> he was a humble man but he was deeply aware of the major interest in him. he was also incredibly comfortable in the media spotlight. we were fortunate enough. we were so trusted by his security that i and my cameraman were often left alone with him or whether he was in front of hundreds of thousands of people, he had a peace. he was very comfortable in the public. in the public eye. and i think that was because he was a very unselfish man. he really did live his life for others and particularly for south africans and as you know, greta, he said if necessary he would lay down his life to g
topic, rand paul thinks he can save the bankruptcy city of detroit with good old-fashioned conservative economics. eric spoke with him exclusively today. we're going to hear part of that interview next. this song came to me this morning and i haven't been able to get it out of my head. now from my head to yours. ♪ if you only hold me tight ♪ we'll be holding on forever i've saved $75 in checked bag fees. [ delavane ] priority boarding is really important to us. you can just get on the plane and relax. [ julian ] havg a card that doesn't charge you foreign transaction fees saves me a ton of money. [ delavane ] we can go to any country and spend money the way we would in the u.s. when i spend money on this card, can see brazil in my future. [ anthony ] i use the explorer card to earn miles in order to go vis my family, which means lot to me. ♪ in order to go vis my family, which means lot to me. on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors whoompare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds
] paul and i have been [paul] well...forever. [kevin] he's the one pern who loves pizza more than i do. [paul] we're obssed. [kevin] we decided to make our obsession our livelihood. [kevin] business was really good. [kevin] then our sauce supplier told me: "you got to get quickbooks." [kevin]quickbooks manages money, tracksales and expenses. [paul] we even use it to accept credit cards. [paul] somebody buys a pie with a credit card, boom, all the counts uate. [paul] when we started hiring,we turned on payroll. [kevin] it's like our pizza.you add the toppings you want, leave off the ones you don't. [kevin] now business is in really great shape. [announcer] start using intuit quickbooks for free at quickbooks-dot-com. well, did you know that just one sheet of bounce outdoor fresh gives you more freshss than two sheets of the leading national store brand? who knew? so, how do you get your bounce? with more freshness in a single sheet. liz: did you see keith bliss on the e floor this no nerves rattled todaa at all. the jobs report failed to rattle the nerves of investors and market partici
. senator rand paul says the best way to get workers back on their feet is to limit the government's role in helping them. >> i do support unemployment benefits for the 26 weeks that they are paid for. if you extend it beyond that you do a disservice to these workers. there was a study that came out a few months ago and it said if you have a worker that has been unemployed for four weeks and on unemployment insurance and another on 99 weeks, which one would hire. nearly every employer said they would hire the person whose been out of work for four weeks. when you let them be out of work >> what's wrong with him?t >> what do you mean? >> i'm sorry, you have to speak. >> do i have to speak? >> yes. >> explain that to me. >> i can only tell you that -- >> that made no sense. that made no sense. >> crazy. >> can i -- >> that made no sense. that was crazy. i'm sorry. sorry to say that very carefully. crazy. >> a u.s. senator crazy, and you say that carefully? >> explain. someone. >> i just tried to start. >> you went to brown. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these e
a chance to befriend everybody, duboise, martin luther king, paul robeson, nelson mandela. out of all the people you have been friends with and struggled with, what makes nelson mandela so uniquely different? >> the people i have been privileged to serve, nelson mandela was the one i least suspected i would ever come to me, personally. i tried several times when he was incarcerated, to gain the privilege of visiting him, but the system would not permit that. himarted corresponding with while he was in prison. i had come to be aware of him through my mentor, the man who i most admired, paul robeson. e was very close to king against thewas apartheid system in the early day of its presence in south africa. he was the first black man to ever receive the nobel prize. looking at south africa from that prison, i began to become more aware of what the african national congress was doing, and what the leadership was aspiring to do, to make the decisions that would help us fight the struggle that the south african people were fighting in resisting apartheid. >> is one thing to work alongside dr
wanted them to the price in nineteen ninety three. nope all. i didn't fight at all. when paul. it was. apartheid when he came to an end in nineteen ninety four when like some africans were down to play for the first time in the country's history the agency won the parliamentary elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa eyes before you. they would get involved. by the bottle all this time. you have shown such a crime patient to detonation. will be made this card. as a whole updated. from the rooftops free at last the june nineteen ninety nine off to just one presidential term councilman dan everett on from politics. he remained committed to promoting peace and justice. the counts against fifty thousand pre invasion of iraq. and what comes out of the team needs in two thousand and five he revealed to the that is eldest son had delayed if the disease. the last three years for mom when frequent hospitalizations as he struggled with for spare cheaper ones. his health deteriorated into the sea and received intense and paste medical care for a lung infection. after
always loved to tell a good joke. and paul simon said, he conceived a model for mortal enemies to overcome their hatred and find a way through compassion to rebuild a nation based on truth, justice, and the power of forgiveness. we'll have special coverage throughout this how. and we'll go to the white house and explore the special connection between mandela and president obama. then on to capitol hill where senator leahy was there in the 1990s. then i'll be joined by martin luther king iii. and we want to use today's question for you and get your thoughts for nelson mandela. how will you remember him and his legacy? >>> coming up next, we're getting into other big headlines of the day. backing up president obama as he looks to resell his signature legislation. joining our conversation, one of the members of that strike team matt cartwright. and that new jobs report. it's just out today showing unemployment falling to a five-year low. but republicans on the hill still not 100% happy about it. we'll explain. stay with us. hi honey, did you get the toaster cozy? yep. got all the
-mail, and twitter. tonight, republican senator rand paul of kentucky speaking at the detroit economic club about jobs and the economy. former secretaries of state madeleine albright and hillary clinton come a remembering south african president nelson mandela. and a white house briefing with secretary jay carney. >> the book affairs events from washington, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house event, briefings, and conferences. and complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> republican senator rand paul at the detroit economic club. some have considered him as a presidential candidate although he himself has not made any formal announcement. this event is part of the road to the white house 2016 coverage. [applause] cracks good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. on this nice brisk detroit michigan day, it is my honor to introduce dr. rand paul, the junior senator from kentucky. the united states senator elected in 2010 and has certain
is in johannesburg, paul i apologize. he's outside mandela's home. paul was there, a crowd gathered at the time. >> reporter: there was indeed. the the crowd started to gather about an hour or two before. people started arriving with flowers. some had family members working inside the house and they had heard president mandela had his last moments fighting for his life. there was a deep quiet. news crews busily with satellite issues and cameras. there was a muted state of shock outside the house. i think everybody knew this was the end. >> paul, help us get a big picture, not detail by detail, but a big picture idea of what the next ten days will be like. >> from here he goes to a morgue. they'll dress his body and he will then go and lie in state at the union building. the first day is vip only, government dignitaries can come view mr. mandela. the next two days will be busy indeed. they'll be for the public. at some point in the next week, we are promised there will be a massive, massive memorial service for him at the stadium where the world cup final took place. that's important because tha
. that will surpass the heads of state and world leaders who came to mourn and to say good-bye to pope john paul ii. largest gathering of heads of state outside of u.n. perhaps ever. we'll have to see how this day goes. and of course, there will be tens of thousands of people, perhaps millions of people, trying to get near the soccer stadium where this event will take place. it begins at 11:00 a.m. local time, 4:00 a.m. eastern time. either supposed to last for about four hours. we understand from the list of speakers that several of nelson mandela's grandchildren will speak, also his co-defendants convicted with mandela in 1963 and sentenced to a life in prison on robben island. one of them will speak as well as heads of state, president obama, president of brazil, china, india, raoul castro of cuba. this country has been friends and allies for some time. quite a day ahead of us, andrea. that's just one day. there will be several days where nelson mandela's body will lie in state at the union building at the national capital here and, of course, culminating event, the funeral in the eastern provin
. they see a political opportunity. we are going to go to paul le page. he said the president doesn't like white people. among several and colorful comments. he had signs on the topic. everybody looking at the negative effects of global warming as he said on transportation. with the ice melting, the northern passages opened up. maybe instead of being at the end of a pipeline, i'm going to stop talking about paul le page because we have breaking news and we will join a special report. >> fellow republicans, nelson mande mandela, the founding president of a democratic nation has departed. he passed on peacefully around 20:50 on the 5th of december. 2013. he is now resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lot of his greatest son. our people have lot of a father. although we knew that this day would come, nothing can diminish our sense of a profound and enduring loss. his struggle for freedom and give him the respect of the world. his humility, his compassion, and his humanity and him they laugh. our thoughts and prayers are with the mandela family. to them we owe a debt of gratitude. they
and paul ryan and the vice presidential nominee t. two seem to be inzisnnc. they have serious policy issues. >> let's count it as baby steps. >> a great way to put it. >> so let's talk about presidential politics. i think it's never too early to talk about the next race. >> reporter: not which somebody from politico. >> rand paul, you said he was on the sunday shows yesterday. he said he is seriously considering a run for president. does that surprise you at all? >> reporter: it doesn't really surprise me, because we've seen really since the 2012 presidential elections ended and rand paul, of course, being in the senate, that he has very serious ambitions to take over the when, the libertarian wing of the republican party his father represented. his father in two presidential campaigns did this in a novelty candidate, somebody who was entertaining because of his ec sen trek kind of here's the way i see it position, but not somebody who was a real force in the party or had an effect on the nominating process. rand paul would get his father's movement. i think he would be taken serious to aff
>> some of paul walker's "fast and furious" moments released online in the wake of his death. production for the seventh "fast and furious" movie has been officially halted. >>> i'm brooke baldwin. thank you so much as always for being with me today. see you back here same time tomorrow. "the lead" with jake tapper starts now. >>> happy repeal day! take it easy, obama care fans and foes. i'm talking about repealing prohibition. it ended 80 years ago this hour. cheers! i'm jake tapper. this is "the lead." >>> the world lead. it's the city where terrorists attacked and killed a u.s. ambassador and three other americans more than a year ago. today, another u.s. citizen has been slain in benghazi, libya. who was ronald thomas smith ii? can his family expect justice? >>> the national lead. with his son's suicide, this has been the worst year of pastor rick warren's life but he has relied on his faith to get through it. pastor warren joins us live to share his theory that faith can lighten the burden not only on your soul but on your health. >>> and the politics lead. how to talk t
did "graceland" with paul simon. we played for more than ten million people who'd never heard of south africa or apartheid before. and it really grabbed the world. ♪ bring back nelson mandela bring him back home to soweto ♪ i want to seem him walking hand in hand with winnie mandela. ♪ >> a salute for mister nelson mandela, walking strongly into freedom. >> the day he walked out of jail, when he came out like this, the whole world screamed. >> africa, amandla! >> marsalis: when you are thinking of mandela, what is the thing that made him able to galvanize everything around him? >> when mandela spoke, when he spoke for us, it wasn't about him; it was about his people. >> we are one country, we are one people. >> mandela really epitomizes the symbolism of our freedom. he became the mouthpiece, and the amplifier and the horn. ( plays national anthem on trumpet ) no matter how busy your morning you can always do something better for yourself. and better is so easy with benefiber. fiber that's taste-free, grit-free and dissolves completely. so you can feel free to add it to anything.
was at stake. there was no home after the storm. st paul but he was a city in shock people who just lost everything. turning to the building to survive. then came news that he meets a woman seeking to have escaped freezing here and driving thousands out of the city they're close to seven hundred inmates here in a moment to the gym gave the storm came about a hundred sixty of them escape more than three weeks after the killer typhoon forty eight are still missing authorities say they're working on finding the remaining fugitives even as security remains tight rope the city. didn't actually take much an effort to search for those who escape. many have returned on the role. you must. most of us when doctors to check our founders which didn't have the intention to skate. i just want to make sure my family was ok eric says he could see the water rising just begun the sparklers. his family lived just across the president. and they had all survived. in a matter of a few hours every prospective jail. so was edgar martinez has been in jail for ten years and drug charges. he too went home to point
doesn't sign. that's the message. an n.a.t.o. summit is being attended in brussels. paul brennan is there for us. why can't n.a.t.o. wait for a signature until after the april elections as hamid karzai wants? >> basically because n.a.t.o. says it would be too late to do that. they need a degree of certainty. they are pressing on hamid karzai to sign the agreement because he has agreed to it in principal with talks with secretary of state john kerry. there are budgetary cycles, planning cycles. you can't switch on and off military trainers. they need a degree of certainty for this to happen. if we don't get the signature on that the zero option will have to be on the table and that is an option where the troops will have to be pulled out. it's an option at this point, nout one they are afraid of threatening, if hamid karzai does not sign the agreement. john kerry described it as needing the best transition possible. and in order to do that they need months of transitioning. it's not good enough to leave it until april. >> in ukraine, the government demonstrations in kiev have been
the press" is back with our political roundtable. here this morning, tom brokaw, al sharpton, paul gigoe and katty kay. now, david gregory. >> we're back from new york. the reverend al sharpton sheer. your book is out now called "the rejected stone." congratulations on that. i want to talk to the group about not really the other side of mandela, just his historical context. he celebrated in death, he celebrated in life, but there is a more divided view on mandela in the anc. senator kennedy on this program back in '86 talking about the push of economic sanctions against south africa when there was political disagreement about that, and indeed, reagan didn't agree. here was senator kennedy in '86. >> what we're interested in doing is achieving the political objectives that desmond tutu has talked about, freeing mandela, freeing detainees. hopefully in the meantime we might get some international group who can go to south africa and look at the 8 to 10,000 detainees, some of whom have been reported beaten to death in the south african prisons. >> tom, this was a different time. cold war is
tonight paul simon handy is that director resets at the institute for security studies good evening to you as well but it only gets to our panel. we've got an exclusive false report from the central african republic i can inspire a t agnew and pride of advent. nepal is voiced by mark thompson in the news. the sound of sporadic gunfire the above rates around on. central african republic capsule has been under siege since sunday morning. nearby the sound of heavy artillery. government officials say christian must resume oil to ousted former presidents will swell was easy. a behind the attack central african multinational forces patrol the streets alongside full masonic or rebels. otherwise the streets are empty the only double room asked the parties of dozens killed in the fighting. awaiting to be transported. residents here remain on edge. many carry machetes and guns the weekend and not greasy we a muslims. it's a question of religion the question of if the city or anything. these countries at where it belongs to all of us. if you don't understand this country be taken for foreigners. we
political roundtable. here this morning, tom brokaw, al sharpton, paul gigoe and katty kay. now, david gregory. >> we're back from new york. the reverend al sharpton is here. your book is out now called "the rejected stone." congratulations on that. i want to talk to the group about not really the other side of mandela, just his historical context. he celebrated in death, he celebrated in life, but there is a more divided view on mandela in the anc. senator kennedy on this program back in '86 talking about the push of economic sanctions against south africa when there was political disagreement about that, and indeed, reagan didn't agree. here was senator kennedy in '86. >> what we're interested in doing is achieving the political objectives that desmond tutu has talked about, freeing mandela, freeing detainees. hopefully in the meantime we might get some international group who can go to south afric been reported beaten to death in the south african prisons. >> tom, this was a different time. cold war is what holds sway over our views. >> first of all, talk about south africa and the
and the names of 46 priests must be released and includes 33 priests in st. paul, minnesota and 13 more in the wionna diocese and an attorney says the decision is a milestone especially for those who have not come forward. >> survivors who are suffering alone in silence thinking they are the only ones who were abused can now know they may not be alone. >> reporter: and they have until december 17 to make the names public. the american civil liberties union is suing the catholic bishops and saying it's on guidelines they oppose on abortions on church-run hospitals and say they were negligent and sites a case of a woman who was not told continuing her pregnancy continued grave problems and she was from michigan and her baby died in hours and the conference of bishops is not commenting on the case. a growing call for changes and invitro fertilization is performed in the u.s. and they want doctors to transfer only one embryo into a women per cycle and the goal is to reduce multiple births and carrying multiples during pregnancy increases premature birth and suggested guidelines go to women
housemate, paul. >> grace is perfect for me. one is okay. i'm 67 next birthday here. >> reporter: so rachel is looking for a new dad on line. >> i'm raising her with my co-parenting partner, paul. who i met through modamily. modfamily is a mash up of mom dad and family. >> reporter: and modamily is a number of new sites matching co-parents. compatible partners for creating a child. >> facebook for fetuses. >> to find fetus, yeah. >> reporter: a dating site that cuts straight to the divorce. what happens when they meet that special somebody? >> see a lawyer. get a co-parenting agreement, get background and health checks and discuss how you are going to get pregnant and financial cost and custody. >> reporter: more than 5,000 people signed up on this site alone. there are other co-parenting sites, too. legally it is unchartered territory. lawyers we spoke with said making babies this way could be fraught with potential pitfalls. that doesn't bother rachel. it all sounds a little bit unromantic. >> it is. i like it that way. >> reporter: she said parenthood is a big decision.
on the streets than in the shelters. paul, appreciate it. let's be more on the weather in the west, now here is dave. >> yeah, the big issue here is this cold air that is pushed down from the north, and it is close to the surface, once you get further south. at first these temperatures -- these are the current readings, gusty winds but right about zero in north dakota, denver there the official reading at 7:00, further south, we get to 25 in oklahoma city, but just above freezing there in dallas. now this is cold air that is coming right at the surface. look at these two temperatures 20 and 50. that's a little different here, because it isn't the space between them. so obviously temperatures well above freezing. as you go up in the atmosphere. you are getting the temperature of 50, and it is falling into air, which aids 20 degrees right at the surface. they need to freeze it before it hits the ground. that's where you get the coating of ice. by tomorrow morning another wave of moisture moves in. this is just a big large area. of either sleet or freezing air. get ice accumulations of at least
it be morrow [kevin] paul and i have been [paul] well...forever. [kevin] he's the one person who loves zza more than i do. [paul] we're obsessed. [kevin] we deced to make our obsession our livelihood. [kevin] business was really good. [kevin] then our sauce supplier told me: "you got to get quickbks." [kevin]quickbooks manages moy, tracks sales and expenses. [paul] we evense it to accept credit cards. [paul] somebody buys a pie with a credit card, boom, all the counts update. [paul] when we started hiring,we turned on payroll. [kin] it's like our pizza.you add the ppings you want, leave off the ones you don't. [kevin] now business is in really great shape. [announcer] art using intuit quickbooks for free at qukbooks-dot-com. >>> it's 7:26. the breaking news is going on in downtown san jose. san carlos and alma dand is closed because of a crash involving an officer. this morning investigators say someone rear-ended a police car that was stopped at a red light. they say the driver was speeding and tried to run. a security guard from a hotel caught him and held him until backup arrived. the office
is about 100,000. >> thank you. we're going to go to paul. >> on the same subject, generally been do you have an idea on some of the countries and their collective responsibilities? what is your idea? everyone is worried about social security crashing, and a lot of people just being left on the side of the road. what would you do? >> actually, i would -- i actually think two or three things, and we have done this report. the afp did a pension report a few years ago. where we also said that employees have to take a share of retirement responsibilities. so we agree that we have to actually pay into our retirement. most of these plans that you see that have been cut right now, it's because the government took a pension holiday. at the very same time as the crash on wall street. because of all the budget cuts. so you have a double whammy going on at the same time. the employers have always paid in and done their responsibility. right now in america, we have to have a three-legged stool, social security, whatever your personal savings may be, and i would argue for a defined benefit pension pl
driver. >> and legal expert paul callan also said in the past, adults and bartenders have been prosecuted for letting people drive drunk but it's extremely rare, john, as you point out earlier, for people this young to be prosecuted for something like this, and it's likely going to send a strong message about underaged drinking and meantime the two teens will appear in court later this month. we will be following this story. >> i've never heard anything like this. it will be interesting to see if teens stand up and take notice. pamela brown, thank you. >>> if you are one of amc movie theater's biggest fans, membership has its privileges. alison kosik tells you why. alison? >> john, why don't you come with me to the movie theater lobby, grab popcorn and stock, yes you heard, amc theaters says it will make it that eetz easy to buy in the soon to be public company. those details are coming up. for over a decade millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux di
a spending plan and head off yet another government shutdown. congressman paul ryan and senator patty murray are putting together a trillion dollar package for next year and are said to be only a few billion dollars away in savings. >>> a cracked windshield forced a new orleans bound flight to return to orlando. a local tv station says southwest pilots noticed the crack on the outer part of the windshield thursday and turned back. the plane landed safely. the passengers were placed on another airplane. >>> in just about an hour, the government will release it's november jobs report. economists expect 185,000 workers were added to the payrolls. the october report registered 204,000 hires. this uptick in hiring may not necessarily be a good thing for investors. trying to figure out if the fed will end its stimulus measures. we'll bring you those numbers live at 8:30 eastern this morning. those are your headlines at this hour, guys. >> thank you. >>> coming up next on "new day," we have much more on the weather making its way east. we'll tell you which states will get the hardest hit and how yo
the world stops me from the moment it has been an incredible outpouring of paul's think it's marc perlman is covering africa summit that is taking place. marc. you've covered many summit before. you really get a sense that this one is different in that regard. they instantly became a difference. overnight then kaylee. maybe but so has been hanging over this the summit which was supposed to discuss very concrete the issues like you know peace and security peace. you know in development and peace and climate change. however now it'll change though because suddenly you had to have the head of the year ahead of the south african delegation make a speech in which the mysticism of the head of the african union peace commission. and so clearly this was the surprise since some delegates were telling him the core doors that a new way. the death of mandela pushed aside many of the debates that were supposed to take place here honestly no one was complaining about that and everyone what was sad but simply the french did not expect this to happen the defense doesn't pay tribute to mandela of the flat
lowered for a foreign dignitary was for pope john paul ii in 2005. on capitol hill friday, former secretary of state hillary clinton talked about nelson mandela. here's some of what she had to say. >> we neat on the day after the oss of a giant among us, someone who, by the power of his example, demonstrated unequivocally how each of us can choose how we will respond to those injustices and grievances, those sorrows and tragedies that afflict all of humankind. nelson mandela will be remembered for many things. he will be certainly remembered or the way he led, his dignity , his extraordinary understanding, not just of how to bring democracy and freedom to his beloved south africa, but how important it was that he first brought freedom to himself. as i spent time with him, starting in 1992 until just in he last year and a half, i was ways struck by the depth of his self-knowledge, of his awareness about how hard it is , of ve a life of integrity service, but to combine within ones self the contradictions that he lived with, a lawyer and a freedom fighter, a prisoner and a leader, a
let you go, universal pictures paying tribute to the late actor paul walker and his on-screen legacy. he was part of one of, really, the studio's biggest franchises they had ever seen. >> people in this room right here, right now, salute. >> some of paul walker's "fast and furious" moments released online in the wake of his death. production for the seventh "fast and furious" movie has been officially halted. >>> i'm brooke baldwin. thank you so much as always for being with me today. see you back here same time tomorrow. "the lead" with jake tapper starts now. >>> happy repeal day! take it easy, obama care fans and foes. i'm talking about repealing prohibition. it ended 80 years ago this hour. cheers! i'm jake tapper. this is "the lead." >>> the world lead. it's the city where terrorists attacked and killed a u.s. ambassador and three other americans more than a year ago. today, another u.s. citizen has been slain in benghazi, libya. who was ronald thomas smith ii? can his family expect justice? >>> the national lead. with his son's suicide, this has been the worst year of pastor ri
century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him today we should remember that america was not always with him. i think that's an important part of history. president reagan opposed the point signatures of sanctions in the 1980s against south africa. it was only in 1990 four years after mandela was released he was received by president bush. he was part of the complex cold war world. this is a more complicated history that the country of the united states should take account of. but mandela himself, you know, he stood apart history and said stop. >> talk about that complex history. >> pretty much as john said. united states was tolerant of the situation particularly the u.s. government. in many ways it was the british government of margaret thatcher that played a much larger role in brokering mandela and de klerk. we celebrate because of his willingness to give up power. mandela was fortunate in one way and something we tourkt today. he got the nobel peace with f.w. de
from the crash that killed paul walker. officials say the man snatched a piece of the charred porsche off a police tow truck as it was being taken away from the scene. the suspect could face charges of theft and tampering with evidence. >>> we're remembering the life and legacy of nelson mandela, the anti-apartheid icon who became south africa's first black president. he died yesterday at the age of 95. our cnn correspondents are stationed around the world with the very latest on the reaction to the loss of a man who truly changed the course of history. you're looking at a live picture right now from johannesburg where a huge public memorial is being planned for early next week. in london, buckingham palace is flying the union flag at half staff right now, there you see it. outside the apollo theater in harlem, in new york city, there's a tribute in lights on its legendary marquee in memory of nelson mandela. president obama referred to nelson mandela as a personal hero. the two men met only once and it was this moment right here, it was back in 2005, president obama was then senator
budget paul ryan are finalizing details of a deal to presents to congress this week, does this look like it will get past both houses? i know we don't know the details yet. >> it is to watch closely and the clock is ticking and i don't know if it will get done in time but there is a chance they can get it done in time to prevent disaster which is what we wants to do. >> reporter: democrats are pub pushing for the bill involving 1.3 million americans, on saturday president obama had this to say about the benefits, have a listen, joe. >> now that economic lifeline is in jeopardy. all because republicans in this congress, which is on track to the most unproductive in history have so far refused to extend it. >> reporter: why do republicans want to see the emergency benefits end? >> well, i think republicans like democrats support the idea of making sure that people who lost their jobs have some kind of a fallback, but the question becomes how long. if you extend the unemployment benefits that is longer than currently right now, they are scheduled to expire i think on december 28, part of
had john paul stevens, alan greenspan, and he would fly from california -- he would come back just to introduce those people. he felt so honored that they would make that effort. mrs. ford came less frequently. they had a running gag. they divided the country in half for fundraising purposes. he had america east of the mississippi. she had the united states west of the mississippi. >> host: a.j. in virginia, one of the homes to the ford family. hi, a.j.. i have to push the button. hi, a.j.. >> caller: i'm curious if there's a specific reason why the first lady invited kings and saints for the first dinner hosted at the white house. >> guest: well, you know, it's interesting. she -- the president became president on august 9, on august 10th, she was informed almost as a matter of factually, by the way, you know that king hussein is coming in a week's time, so she had nothing to do. this is something that was arake #* range -- arranged in the nixon administration, and she, literally, within the first 24 hours was kind of thrown in, sink or swim, to organize a state dinner for the kin
is now in the most you will area, and paul could scarcely travel the road to demascus in syria. the debate in the house of commons began with a staggering statistic, namely that one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. the focus of the commons debate was on the persecution of christians, several noted that whether or not you are a person of faith, all should be concerned by this troubling trend. ultimately, freedom of religion weather for s a bell other cherished freedoms where this first freedom is compromised, the whole human rights is under assault. in country after country, freedom of religion is indeed compromised and christians, to borrow a phrase from history, are the eye of the gathering storm. this is perhaps no more true than in the middle east. here we see governmental, societal and communal violence and repression against religious communities with specifically targets religious minorities, including christians. these realities have been exacerbated by th
to pay paul. moving forward, the republican majority wants to eliminate hundreds of thousand if not millions more students from the pell grant program. the republican passed budget will do exactly that by cutting $98 billion from that program alone. to be sure, students and families continue to struggle to afford the cost of a college degree. skyrocketing college costs in recent years have eroded the purchasing power of the pell grant. forcing pell grant recipients to increase. their reliance on student loans next year's maximum pell grant award of $5785 will cover a smaller share of college cost since the start of the program. it's troubling to me to know that pell grant recipients are already more than twice as likely as other students to have student loans. in closing i want to say that this congress is working to reauthorize the higher education act. i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to value the pell grant program as a piece of the larger budget discussions and not limit themselves to solving short term funding problems with long lasting cuts to student aid
it today, but did you see patti moistuurray and paul ryan the way i look at it, they're on the football field, they brought the can out, and you know those things they set it in when they go to kick off? they've got it sitting there. >> it's not lucy with her finger on the ball, is it? >> you don't know. it could come as early as next week if it doesn't get messed up. >> that is a great headline. >> they're clearly kicking it past the next election. any open government for two years where we're actually have a budget is like nirvana for us now. it's like the promise land, government open for two years, no promises, doing nothing with intiethsmentes, nothing with tax reform, nothing with -- just paying for some, you know, trying to lessi inen the effect sequestration. >> look at the different points on the board. at this point in the game, we'll take that, right? >> and then the other thing that i just wanted to mention in following up on our conversations is what's going on in china? my man. my man. for the democratic party, i'm with biden. did you see, they send him over to china, boom
, paul walker. an 18-year-old is under arrest in los angeles. a second man is expected to surrender soon. they allegedly stole pieces of the porsche off of the back of the tow truck. >>> and finally, a piece of music history is going up for sale today. bob dylan played that. a fender stratocaster at a 1965 music festival. marking his turn from folk to rock 'n' roll, when he went electronic. christie's says that the guitar, being sold with its original strap, could sell for $500,000. i say it could sell for a lot more than $500,000. >> right on. >> right on. >> more than $500,000. you heard it here first. >>> get some weather from ginger zee. >> hello there. and good morning, everybody. we're out with the crowd. and enduring the rain. these ladies from texas. happy birthday to you, by the way. what's your name? >> kim. >> they say they're from dallas. they're way warmer here. brownsville and corpus christi, in windchill advisories. you're getting away with it, being here in new york city. let's look at the forecast because we have to start with a picture out of ft. smith, arkansas. you se
that is given to you, but something that you are endowed with. paul, thank you, you have stood your ground. you stood in the face of another horror that was almost unimaginable, the horror of genocide in our time. you saved and protected others. it was a great example not only of courage, but of compassion. as we gather here, we are reminded of those who have given so much to ensure that the hope that is represented in tom's legacy lives on. this foundation really embodies tom's spirit. it is quite humbling for people like madeline albright, my dear friend, and i, to know that secretaries of state come and go, but what remains is that profound commitment to making a difference in whatever position we find ourselves in standing up and speaking out for those who might otherwise never have a voice. i am deeply honored to be given this award, particularly on behalf of two causes that are near and dear to my heart, women's rights and internet freedom. i want to acknowledge publicly the great work that tom's grandson did for me in the state department and continues to do at the intersection of civil
? if this is the case, let israel have more of the high ground by paul -- calling his bluff. winning the debate, and changing completely its positioning, and be in a much better position regarding iran, where people do not listen to us right now because of ongoing occupation. >> it is not our dialogue, but i think all of our direction on the palestinian region, it is the wrong direction, and we must take a timeout for some time to explain for ourselves why are we in this deadlock. least favor up until today. the second, iranian issue. i do not discuss publicly the iranian issues, and i'm not ready to say something in addition to what i said. i think it is really syria's decision, and stereo's this vision is impossible not to interview, it is a long discussion. i'm not sure that all the people here have all of the information, and they know to take decisions out and understand all of the this is in picture and details. --is not like and white black-and-white. must take the decisions, not in public opinion, but really in some discussions in the cabinet with people that have all of the information
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